Monthly Archives: June 2021

Sky cat.

Miya likes to come in through the roof window this time of year. Obviously as late as possible and normally making quite a racket as she plops onto the floor of the loft, startling Millie.

How does she climb up?

Well, she scales a stone garden wall and then leaps vertically up the side of our house to access the roof. Terrifying.

Both agree the swift show is wonderful and are very happy the sun is warmer and the clouds are bubbling high into the long, light evenings.

Roll up.

There are drop in clinics running this weekend for currently the youngest portion of the national Covid vaccination program, the eighteen year olds.

Millie had her text through a few days ago notifying her she could attend one of these clinics.

She had to take a photographic identification so we dug out her passport.

I drove down with her to the enormous film studios on the outskirts of the city, it was quite something driving into it, lots of run down industrial units colonised by flocks of noisy seagulls.

We parked up and she put a mask on and joined the queue with lots of other young people. Red stripy tape and orange bollards, they all stood apart without being asked. Some on their own, some with mates, some with parents, most on their phones probably checking in with a nice selfie and a hashtag #gotstabbed

Our children have had many vaccines in their lives already, this one felt different. Probably because of it’s newness and it’s immediacy. The other vaccines as babies you knew there was a slim chance of them getting the said diseases. This one is different isn’t it?

I waited an hour in the car watching other parents in their cars, watching the shuttle bus pull up bringing more young people. It was busy.

Millie texted me while inside, in her words:

There was no daylight inside, the building was really big but the ceilings were low and everywhere was white..

Corridors were white too with small windows in where I could see people sat inside. Lots nurses and doctors walking around in their uniforms often wheeling trolleys with large computers on and stacked up carts with the medical supplies on.

I sat in a waiting area next to another girl (well 2 metres next to her) and we chatted about stuff. When it was my turn, I was taken through to a station and they asked me some questions about if I was well. Then I received the injection and waited for a few minutes to make sure I was feeling fine.

And then out she came, clutching an information sheet and asking for lunch.

Pocket pilfer.

Pointy nose, perfect shape for sneaking in pockets.

We have a pocket thief and she loves tissues. Tissues are very nice and tasty, sweet wrappers are lovely too.

Beware.

Afternoon sun.

Parklife.

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