Roll up.

There are drop in clinics running this weekend for currently the youngest portion of the national Covid vaccination program, the eighteen year olds.

Millie had her text through a few days ago notifying her she could attend one of these clinics.

She had to take a photographic identification so we dug out her passport.

I drove down with her to the enormous film studios on the outskirts of the city, it was quite something driving into it, lots of run down industrial units colonised by flocks of noisy seagulls.

We parked up and she put a mask on and joined the queue with lots of other young people. Red stripy tape and orange bollards, they all stood apart without being asked. Some on their own, some with mates, some with parents, most on their phones probably checking in with a nice selfie and a hashtag #gotstabbed

Our children have had many vaccines in their lives already, this one felt different. Probably because of it’s newness and it’s immediacy. The other vaccines as babies you knew there was a slim chance of them getting the said diseases. This one is different isn’t it?

I waited an hour in the car watching other parents in their cars, watching the shuttle bus pull up bringing more young people. It was busy.

Millie texted me while inside, in her words:

There was no daylight inside, the building was really big but the ceilings were low and everywhere was white..

Corridors were white too with small windows in where I could see people sat inside. Lots nurses and doctors walking around in their uniforms often wheeling trolleys with large computers on and stacked up carts with the medical supplies on.

I sat in a waiting area next to another girl (well 2 metres next to her) and we chatted about stuff. When it was my turn, I was taken through to a station and they asked me some questions about if I was well. Then I received the injection and waited for a few minutes to make sure I was feeling fine.

And then out she came, clutching an information sheet and asking for lunch.

Posted on June 12, 2021, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. A relief for you and yet another example of how young people are rising to the challenge. I get so cross when they are portrayed as careless of the wellbeing of others and themselves!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I couldn’t agree more, I think the generalising of all young people as hopeless and unopinionated is so damaging and it is creating a worse divide between generations. To live in a world were all generations learnt off each other eh?

      Like

  2. You both must feel such a sense of relief. When my children, adults in their thirties, finally had theirs, I felt like we had successfully dodged a minefield. I followed your coverage of the epidemic with great interest from California. You brought your corner of the world to life for me, thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Sarah, thank you for your kind words, it means a lot to get such lovely comments and to know that my drawings have helped portray what I’ve experienced. I wish you and your family well.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: