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In Captivity.

The World is in captivity, closed in, shut down, no go.

We will paint Rainbows in our windows.

We will plant seeds in our gardens.

We will thrive on ten cups of tea a day and that forgotten pack of bourbon biscuits at the bottom of the draw in the kitchen.

We will watch the news on repeat, looping around until the information spills back out the other ear.

We will wonder what day it is, even though it isn’t Christmas.

We will stop buying.

We will stop.

Form an orderly queue.

So currently we are allowed to only leave the house for essential supplies and as infrequently as possible. One person is allowed to go. If you are over seventy years of age, you are told to stay in the house for the next twelve weeks and also if you are in certain medical at risk groups.

We managed to leave it a week so it was time to go to the supermarket, I picked my local one nearest to the house. List in hand I waited behind newly laid strips of stripey sticky tape laid out a two metre intervals in the car park.

I wore some plastic gloves, the woman in front of me wore a face mask. Another woman shouted at her young daughter to stop running up to people.

Somewhere up the line, a man coughed and everyone took a step back at the same time.,

A security guard waited outside and as one person left the shop, one was let in. It was a mixed queue of people, from women with prams and babies to elderly people. I had no judgement of these people, I am sure they all had their reasons to be here today and we all waited for our turn to go into the shop.

The shop was quiet and calm, I moved around with my basket putting in my shopping. Tins were in short supply as was bread but there was plenty of food for me to cook with and I certainly hope the panic buying has passed now as there are now strict guidelines on how many items we can buy.

The roads were quieter than I have ever seen today.

The sun still shone.

The death toll rose again.

I drove home and washed my hands.

Shutting down.

My evening walk tonight was even quieter than last night. Hardly any traffic on our street lined with terrace houses and neatly stacked recycling bags of tins and bottles and grass cuttings from today’s lawn mowing. A broken mower has been dumped outside one house, its electrical cord hanging, severed after a mishap when someone decided looking the other way to the electric mower would be okay.

The electronic billboard wasn’t working tonight and I was glad not see the Covid 19 symptom advert. There has been news saturation for me today. Too many people still flocking in groups to enjoy the beautiful spring sunshine and infecting each other amid images of Italian and Spanish hospitals.

Tonight the easterly wind moves up the main road free from cars and carries the scent of fire from the hill over the valley. As the hill looms into view, the huge fire burning looks eerily beautiful and I take time out to watch the flames and smell the air.

My walk brings me to our local play park which has today been sealed up with red stripey tape and a notice.

The parks are closed in the city as of today to prevent the spread of the virus. The council says it is because the virus lives on metal and surfaces and therefore children are likely to spread it when they play outside.

My throat still hurts from last week but I feel well and the children are well which is a relief. We played in the garden today as our world became even smaller around us.

It is written on the walls.

I’m walking the dog later at night so I can stay away from people.

I noticed a new electronic billboard being installed the other night. The first adverts are ringing out the message.

It is here and it is spreading so very fast.

We are in a new world right now. The new buzzwords are self-isolation, quarantine and death toll.

My children are making rainbows to put in the window today as the sun shines and the death toll mounts.

Bird is the word.

autumn-starlings

I’m dedicating January to the birds that come to my garden. I have no exotic varieties, just your average Joes of the bird world but to me they are wonderful and they think I’m great right now as I’ve hung three brand new feeders from my studio in an attempt to encourage more into my little urban garden.

My house is part of a Victorian terrace built by the miners and their families 150 years ago. A descendent lives a few doors up and says that they were built to house the families who kept chickens and grew their food here.

Fast forward a century or so and the city has grown around these houses and the mines have gone. But the wildlife is still here, hanging on and adapting to the pace of life and the endless rain.

Today’s post is in salute to the starlings that frequent my garden. Sleek and noisy little birds. Starlings are wonderful mimics of sound. They will copy what they hear and repeat it back with relish. Well you can imagine that Swansea is a feast for these little flocks of sound machines. From car alarms, mopeds to mobile phones it is never ever quiet around here and these little birds congregate on the telephone lines in the winter and belt out their whistle and chirps.

In deepest January they are most welcome to strip my feeders, tease my chickens and entertain me in my studio to a Swansea mega mix of noise. Demolishing fat balls within ten minutes and then entertaining me with their sound effects.

One summer morning you could hear the noise of a single alarm clock coming from an open window, within seconds, the voices of twenty alarm clocks were ringing out over the rooftops and telephone wires.

Wakey wakey.

Ghosts of Christmas past.

A little mix of my best bits at Christmas.
I wish you all a peaceful time and remember kindness is always better than a plateful of sprouts.

One glass wonder.

wine
A poem I made.

I had some wine,
It went to my head,
And off I went,
early to bed.

Cat versus cake.

Angie bakes six layers of different coloured sponge cake and leaves them to cool on the kitchen counter.

Renee cat comes along and takes a nibble out of EACH layer.

Calculate:

A) The level of swearing from Angie at the discovery of nibbled cake.

B) The exact percentage of remaining cake.

C) The exact amount of extra buttercream needed to cover the nibbled cake.

D) The amount of tea needed to calm Angie down.

Chuck it in the…

Today is over. That is all. Oh and it rained.

Little box of happiness.

Evie has a box.

Not just any old box.

It’s a box of happy things.

So when things get bad or sad.

She pulls the box down off the shelf and looks through it.

The box changes throughout the year.

(I think there’s a few conkers in there right now).

Sometimes mum sneaks in some chocolate…

There’s a bar of soap too as it smells lovely.

There’s fluffy and shiny things.

Small things of wonder that when picked up, replace sadness or worry with smiles.

What would be in your box?

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